BORIS HAUF SOLO @SPEKTRUMBERLIN

photo credit Dieter Hartwig
photo credit Dieter Hartwig

In this solo act I’ll investigate how concepts of processual repetition, patterns and loops can engage the imaginary and calculated potential of iteration and disintegration, delay and modulation. Observing the deformation of repetitions after they have been established, microscopic loops interact with elongated nested phrases and expose the gradual decay of the logic of sound.

SPEKTRUM | art science community
Bürknerstraße 12 12047 Berlin

Doors: 19:30 / Start time: 20:00
Entrance on donation: 5-10 euro (up to your offer)

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THE PEELED EYE (review BILL MEYER, @dustedinc )

The four men who make up The Peeled Eye have been around a while now, long enough to forget first impressions. Certainly nothing about their self-titled debut is going to make you remember the restrained and/or minimal sounds of efzeg, Kahn-Korber-Weber, Trapist or SSSD. While a snapshot of Boris Hauf (baritone saxophone), Martin Siewert (guitar), Christian Weber (bass), and Steve Heather (drums) might cue you to think you’re going to hear jazz, what comes out of the speakers when you put the stylus down is more of a Godzilla tap-dance. Heather drums like a machine-gunner clearing out a field, Hauf’s horn flails like the tail of a toppled brontosaurus, and the guitar and drums careen like they’re crashing an audition for The Ex. The opening tune may be named “Kind Of,” but there’s nothing tentative about its determined heaviosity.

There is, however, a strategic side to The Peeled Eye’s music that refutes parts of the description proffered above. They might sound like they’re flailing, but each blow lands exactly where it’s intended. The combo’s dynamics move too fluidly from pummel to scrabble to be accidental, and when they want to ease up, the complementarity of their contrasts is far too effective to be the product of chance. “Heavy Quarters,” which occupies the second half of side one, proceeds through a sequence of bleak mood inducers — triggered film samples, slow stomp, Sonic Youth-like guitar screams — like an effective film soundtrack.

[…] The meaty satisfaction dealt by The Peeled Eye suggests that free improv apprenticeship is a worthy pre-rock tutelage.

Bill Meyer
dustedmagazine

THE PEELED EYE (review JOHN EYLES, @allaboutjazz)

The Peeled Eye is the debut release from Boris Hauf’s revived Shameless label, which has switched from being a subscription-only limited edition label to releasing experimental rock, noise and pop recordings. This release is an edition limited to three hundred copies pressed on yellow vinyl. Collectable, eh?

In The Peeled Eye, Hauf’s own baritone saxophone is joined by Martin Siewert on guitar, Christian Weber on bass and Steve Heather on drums. Between them, the four members have impressive improv credentials behind them in groups such as Efzeg, Mersault and Trapist, so it was surprising to see this grouping described as “a noisecore / doomjazz quartet” with no mention of improv. Although definitions of such sub-genres tend to overlap after a while, this designation does successfully convey the bottom-heavy, density of the quartet’s soundscape as well as their music’s predominantly dark mood, a combination which makes for compelling, addictive listening.

On the seven tracks, ranging in length from just over two minutes to just over twelve, the four members meld together into an awe-inspiring unit whose adrenalin-fuelled bravado at times sparks memories of Last Exit. All four contribute equally to the ensemble sound with no pecking order at work, and no hint of a distinction between solo instruments and “rhythm section.” They all take on both roles, the four strands weaving together into a rich tapestry in which the instruments remain clearly distinguishable, never degenerating into noise.

When Hauf plays his baritone’s lower reaches, the combination with Weber’s bone-crunching bass guitar is thrilling stuff, the quartet’s trademark sound. However, this is a group of equals, with Siewert and Heather just as important to the totality. The Peeled Eye creates music that is greater than any one of the four. More soon, please, Shameless.

4 1/2 stars out of 5
By JOHN EYLES, Published: November 3, 2015

THE PEELED EYE (review on VITAL WEEKLY #1005)

A new release on Shameless, a label of Boris Hauf. Around 2001-2002 he released several
of his projects on this label. And that was it. Not that Hauf turned away from music.
Far from it. But Shameless no longer seemed a useful outlet. But now it is again, with
an excellent first release by The Peeled Eye. The quartet consisting of Martin Siewert
(guitar), Christian Weber (bass), Steve Heather (drums) and Boris Hauf (baritone sax,
piano), make a powerful and convincing statement. They are a “noisecore doomjazzquartet”
in the words of Hauf himself. They construct thick and noisy musical pieces. Seven in
total. Sometimes all seem to follow their own individual path, resulting in a wonderful
cacophonic whole, as in the opening track ‘Kind of”. Evidently free jazz is an ingredient
in their music. Also the prominent sax playing by Hauf clearly comes from a jazz attitude.
Like in ‘Heavy Quarters’ where his playing is embedded in a slow but brutal sounding
rock environment. The intro and the outro of same piece illustrate their interest for
pure sound textures. ‘Diiisko’ has Hauf and Siewert in a fine battle. In all pieces they
sound very tight and together. Complexity and rock primitivism are in a perfect blend
here. This is not just a hell of noise, but free rock at his best. (DM)
vital weekly #1005

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“In three seconds from zero to twelve tones.” The Peeled Eye REVIEW

THE PEELED EYE

english:
Together four notorious engineers design a vehicle of a different kind. No frills. Sleek design. Schematic without hierarchy: rhizome electronics. FreeJazzSax gearbox. In three seconds from zero to twelve tones. With screeching tires and drumming heartbeat the vehicle whizzes through stringed thunderstorms. On dark streets of bass-lines into a serious nothing. Unlimited Doom. A poly-logical Inferno, a decrepit ghost, a swarm, a lamenting Ghul, yet another inferno pass outside. Occasional longer stays in abandoned parking garages. Volume and degree of tonal density drop, but not the tension. The ceiling lighting flickers, raindrops whisper, windows steam up. An electronic pulse starts up the engine. In driving a motive makes its way inside the sound body, gets developed and in its best moment thrown out the window. And then again, the same. Greetings to the noise of that night, it’s tinkering, it’s punch. Hinted phrasing, amorphous force, Patterns without stencils, a fine net of questions becomes the answer. To what? Exactly. The tank is full of relations. No more space for vanities. In this dark miracle musical ride. (steroid) [translation Boris Hauf]

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german (original):
Vier berüchtigte Ingenieure entwerfen gemeinsam ein Gefährt der anderen Art. Kein Schnickschnack. Schlankes Design. Schaltplan ohne Hierarchie: Rhizomelektronik. FreeJazzSax-Getriebe. In drei Sekunden von null auf zwölf Töne. Mit quietschenden Reifen und trommelndem Herzschlag saust das Vehikel durch ein Saitengewitter. Auf finsteren Bassstraßen in ein schwerwiegendes Nichts. Unlimited Doom. Draußen ziehen vorbei: ein polylogisches Inferno, ein klappriger Geisterzug, ein Schwarm, ein lamentierender Ghul, noch so ein Inferno. Gelegentlich kann es zu längeren Aufenthalten in verlassenen Parkhäusern kommen. Lautstärke und Grad der Tondichte fallen ab, die Spannung nicht. Die Deckenbeleuchtung flackert, Regentropfen flüstern, die Scheiben laufen an. Ein elektronischer Impuls wirft die Maschine wieder an. Während der Fahrt gerät ein Motiv ins Innere der Klangkarosserie, es wird weiterentwickelt und in seinem besten Moment aus dem Fenster geworfen. Und dann gleich nochmals. Grüß uns den Noise dieser Nacht, ihr Gefrickel, ihren Punch. Angedeute Phrasierungen, amorphe Wucht, Patterns ohne Schablonen, ein feines Netz aus Fragen wird zur Antwort. Worauf? Exakt. Der Tank ist voll mit Relationen. Für Eitelkeiten ist kein Platz mehr. In dieser dunklen Wunderkarre aus Musik. (steroid)

http://freistil.klingt.org/ issue #63

BUY HERE : shameless web store