gepresste Hände erzeugen Druck

check out this new piece with:
3 awesome performers, a barisax player turned pseudo performer, 3 double sided panels, a cymbal (played by the barisax player turned pseudo performer), a bell (done by the same dude), a blue light, a bow and an arrow.

sounds great, right? It’s part of this year’s Tanztage at Sophiensäle, curated by the ever brilliant Peter Pleyer.
check it or miss it. (you’ll prolly miss it cuz it’s already sold out. also most of you don’t live in Berlin. Thanks for your patience though.) Either way, hope this finds you well. Happy New Year and hope to see you soon, somewhere down the road. Cheers, Boris

Monday January 7 and Tuesday January 8, 2013 @ 8:30PM
Sophien Säle, Sophienstraße 18, 10178 Berlin-Mitte

gepresste Hände erzeugen Druck

Alles ist erlaubt.
Alles ist getan.

Bring ein Buch und schlag es auf.

Der Spielplatz ist gewaltig.
Die Variationen unendlich.

Teile das Archiv.
Geschichte oder Geschichten?

Spielzeuge sind herausgesucht, Variationen dekliniert.

3 Flächen und 4 Menschen.
Der Rahmen, wo wir überlappen.

CHOREOGRAFIE Julian Weber
TANZ, PERFORMANCE Claudia Tomasi, Cinira Macedo, Boris Hauf, Julian Weber
MUSIK Boris Hauf
BÜHNENBILD Julian Weber

Gefördert durch Tanztage Berlin / SOPHIENSÆLE, Dank an alle.

oh yeah… also performing: a spot light, a skeleton, nail polish, newspaper and spray paint.

it’s a party for your eyes, ears, nose and other stuff.

Ultimately it’s a curiosity that sounds like nothing else.

“[…] On Next Delusion by Berlin-based saxophonist Boris Hauf, […] forms […] an even more unconventional lineup. There can be few instrumentations that are completely novel, but three horns matched with three drumsets recalls few precedents. Waxed on one of the German’s regular trips to Chicago, Hauf has assembled a talented crew, though their abilities are almost totally sublimated to the leader’s offbeat conceptions.
For much of the time, the three percussionists (Frank Rosaly, Steven Hess and Michael Hartman) are so restrained as to be subliminal and the horns (Keefe Jackson, alongside Stein and Hauf) aren’t much more demonstrative. It’s largely impossible to tell who does what in the four tracks, which defy categorization in their execution of Hauf’s austere and rigorous charts. Dissonant unisons and subdued drones characterize the horn lines, which often sound on a parallel but unconnected track to the rumbling massed drums. Ultimately it’s a curiosity that sounds like nothing else.”

John Sharpe
The New York City Jazz Record
NEW YORK’s ONLY HOMEGROWN JAZZ GAZETTE