refugees welcome in der Sammelstelle in der Schmidt-Knobelsdorff-Str

Sammelstelle in der Schmidt-Knobelsdorff-Str.: Zelte sind aufgebaut, heute Abend werden die Flüchtlinge aus Bayern erwartet, wir haben Hygieneartikel gebracht, davon wird mehr gebraucht ebenso wie kleine Wasserkocher und Babyartikel (kein Essen), warme Männerkleidung und ehrenamtliche Helfer. “Spandau hilft” koordiniert. Es ist eine gedrückte Stimmung auch bei MitarbeiterInnen, weil eine große Unsicherheit da ist, wie die Situation sich in den nächsten Tagen entwickelt. SozialarbeiterInnen und Security machen einen großartigen Job. Alle Sprachen sind vertreten, viele Konflikte können schnell gelöst werden. Winter is coming.

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new Shameless release

I’ve started my label Shameless again. First up is the debut release of The Peeled Eye — a noisecore/doomjazz quartet with Boris Hauf (baritone saxophone), Steve Heather (drums), Martin Siewert (guitar) and Christian Weber (bass).  The work of these longtime musical collaborators dates back to the mid-1990s in bands like efzeg. Avoiding minimalist improv aesthetics, The Peeled Eye is resoundingly aural in this spontaneous, impulsive, and eruptive recording. The Peeled Eye performed at Ulrichsberg Kaleidophon 2015 (check here for videos) and is playing a European tour in Spring 2016.

The limited edition of 300 is pressed on yellow vinyl and available immediately for
EUR 20,- (incl. digital download and free shipping worldwide) at the Shameless online store:shamelessrecords.rocks

Chicagoans, Berliners and Wieners can opt for “Local Pickup” to expedite their fix!! Please contact us atoffice@shamelessrecords.rocks for details after your purchase. We will offer this option as long as stock lasts.

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Boris Hauf Sextet at Constellation

Berlin-based reedist and composer Boris Hauf has been a regular visitor to Chicago since 1999, developing strong ties with local musicians on his sometimes extended stays. One especially noteworthy product of these collaborations is his sextet, which performs locally tonight for the first time since the 2011 release of its most recent album, Next Delusion (Clean Feed). Hauf leads five local jazz and experimental musicians, combining their aesthetics for a restrained but not minimalist sound that borrows the solo language of free improvisation and the patience of avant-­garde drone. Over four extended pieces, he and fellow reedists Keefe Jackson and Jason Stein play braided long tones and multipitched clusters of percussive pops over a mix of thrumming, scraping textures and ferocious polyrhythms from kit drummers Frank Rosaly, Steven Hess, and Michael Hartman. Few ensembles can match this sextet’s decisive motion among pure sound exploration, carefully harnessed chaos, and meticulously ordered drones.

Peter Margasak

When: Thu., May 28, 8:30 p.m.
Price: $10

Source: Boris Hauf Sextet, Jeph Jerman & Tim Barnes | Constellation | Jazz | Chicago Reader

THE PEELED EYE

Please join us for the debut concerts of the new noisecore – doom jazz (yes… really…) quartet of longtime musical collaborators Hauf / Heather / Siewert / Weber. The collaboration of the four dates back to the mid- 90s in bands like efzeg and heaven and. Craving to step up to the reductionist minimalist improv Zeitgeist with a clearly audible spontaneously impulsive and eruptive high-energy alternative they recorded The Peeled Eye which will be part of the first batch of releases of Boris Hauf’s label shameless in late 2015. At both concerts you’ll be able to pre-order the vinyl release for an ridiculously awesome pre-order price. According to the new quiet, much is the new little. (also, yes…. really…)

The Peeled Eye
Boris Hauf – baritone saxophone, piano
Steve Heather – drums
Martin Siewert – guitar
Christian Weber – electric bass
link  (w/ audio samples of the upcoming release)

 

April 29 (Wednesday) doors 8pm, show 9pm
ausland, lychener str. 60, 10437 Berlin

May 1 (Friday) 11pm
Ulrichsberger Kaleidophon 2015

“I’ve been trying to find a way for the terror and the beauty to live together in one song. I know it’s possible.” Sonny Sharrock

thanks and all the best,
Boris

round the creep of the wave line

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What you’ll hear in the Fern Room is Round the creep of the wave line by composers and musicians Boris Hauf and Keefe Jackson. For this collaboration, the composers considered the materials and elements in the Fern Room—soil, metal, glass and sunlight—in parallel to the materials and elements of the saxophones and clarinets they play—wood, metal, plastic and breath. Combining their instruments with recordings of plants growing, and incorporating long silences and subtle phrasing, they composed separate tracks of different lengths for each loudspeaker. The result is that the sound combinations are always different, so the piece grows and changes organically and unpredictably, much like the plants in the Fern Room.

Exhibition hours: DAILY, 9:00AM-5:00PM

Opening Reception:Sunday, February 1, 3-5pm

Fern Room, Lincoln Park Conservatory 2391 N. Stockton Drive

FREE ADMISSION

About the artists
Boris Hauf is a composer and multi-instrumentalist who lives and works in Berlin. He has composed for large and small ensembles, performance art, radio, video, and installation. Since 1999 he has regularly collaborated with many Chicago musicians.

Keefe Jackson is a reed player and composer wo is a key member of Chicago’s vibrant improvised music scene— as such he regularly collaborates with many local and visiting musicians. A respect for traditional forms combined with adventurous experimentation exemplifies his approach to saxophone and clarinet.

Genesis of round the creep of the wave line

Science has shown that entire forests are all interconnected by networks of fungi. ‘Maybe plants are using fungi the way we use the Internet and sending acoustic signals through this Web.’
‘[…]Plants can recognize when a good neighbor is growing next to them,’ says Monica Gagliano, evolutionary ecologist at the University of Western Australia. ‘[…] this communication may be based upon an acoustic exchange.’

Drawing upon Hauf’s and Jackson’s extensive assortment of saxophones and clarinets, using their natural timbral varitations based on the overtone series, together with sampled sounds (especially those of plants growing, amplified) and synthesized sounds, and processing them both by both digital and analog methods. Then mixing these at first seemingly disparate elements all together, and finding a ‘whole’ — but instead of trying to impose an artificial order or a narrative structure, allowing the man-made and natural sounds to co-exist and co-mingle with the experience of the actual ferns and the humidity in the Conservatory. An especially important aspect of this will be the quiet spaces and silences that are a natural compliment to winter weather.

Sunlight, glass and steel; humidity, soil and concrete; water, rubber and copper: the physical elements (inanimate) at play in growing ferns, beside the ferns (animate) themselves.
Wind, brass, and wood; aluminum, copper and plastic: the physical elements (inanimate) at play in growing sounds, beside the sounds (animate) themselves.

In experiencing this piece the audience is invited to take a position to ask: At what point do the animate and the inanimate reverse roles?

Using live reed instruments, recordings of the sounds of plants growing, amplifying and ornamenting the natural sounds of plants, 4 channel analog and digital processing, Boris Hauf and Keefe Jackson blur the lines between these at-first-glance disparate elements – illuminate the similarities and differences of the creative processes occurring betwixt and amongst the plants and the recordings.

During the process of creating the piece, a similar approach will be taken toward combining the individual contributions: in using the recordings, editing and processing them, and finally arranging the sounds throughout the Fern Room an attempt will be made to bring these decisions forth by working together not through a traditional artistic collaborative effort or the type of teamwork espoused by workplace efficiency experts, but by following the trajectories of the creative and reductive impulses and organizing things with the least amount of ‘intervention’ possible, to imitate the process of the plants’ growth.