in anticipation of the reissue of CLARK here’s Frans De Waard’s 2005 review:

“
The activities of UK born worldtraveller Boris Hauf are numerous: playing with Efzeg, with TV Pow, with Lozenga and even a Berlin based classic rock cover band The Understated Brown, he also finds time to produce his own solo things. Armed with his laptop he sets out to produce a fine bunch of microsounding glitch ambient or whatever you call it, but here on ‘Clark’ he comes up with something that sidesteps that: his own version of techno music. Stripped bare of all unnecessary elements, adding his own sometimes creepy sounds, […] which gives this dance music a weird twist and certainly makes this less useful for your next rave. It’s more like after party music, when you have left the real party behind, and on a late night train going home, still being in the mood for some more techno related music. The train goes past sparsely lit cities with great speed and you can also sit down and listen, while your feet tap away with the rhythm. Certainly weird enough for techno music, but pleasant enough to be throughout entertaining and breaking away from well-covered territories of microsound. Very nice indeed.”
FdW, Vital Weekly 515, 2005

Clark is being reissued on Shameless in February 2017, pre-order here.

Mastering by Todd Carter, Chicago
Artwork by the amazing Julian Gosper
Photos Patrick Pagel

#vinyl #180gr #scifi #minimaltechno #spacebutt #design #ello #space #techno #synth #beats

Boris Hauf Sextet at Constellation

Berlin-based reedist and composer Boris Hauf has been a regular visitor to Chicago since 1999, developing strong ties with local musicians on his sometimes extended stays. One especially noteworthy product of these collaborations is his sextet, which performs locally tonight for the first time since the 2011 release of its most recent album, Next Delusion (Clean Feed). Hauf leads five local jazz and experimental musicians, combining their aesthetics for a restrained but not minimalist sound that borrows the solo language of free improvisation and the patience of avant-­garde drone. Over four extended pieces, he and fellow reedists Keefe Jackson and Jason Stein play braided long tones and multipitched clusters of percussive pops over a mix of thrumming, scraping textures and ferocious polyrhythms from kit drummers Frank Rosaly, Steven Hess, and Michael Hartman. Few ensembles can match this sextet’s decisive motion among pure sound exploration, carefully harnessed chaos, and meticulously ordered drones.

Peter Margasak

When: Thu., May 28, 8:30 p.m.
Price: $10

Source: Boris Hauf Sextet, Jeph Jerman & Tim Barnes | Constellation | Jazz | Chicago Reader

THE PEELED EYE

Please join us for the debut concerts of the new noisecore – doom jazz (yes… really…) quartet of longtime musical collaborators Hauf / Heather / Siewert / Weber. The collaboration of the four dates back to the mid- 90s in bands like efzeg and heaven and. Craving to step up to the reductionist minimalist improv Zeitgeist with a clearly audible spontaneously impulsive and eruptive high-energy alternative they recorded The Peeled Eye which will be part of the first batch of releases of Boris Hauf’s label shameless in late 2015. At both concerts you’ll be able to pre-order the vinyl release for an ridiculously awesome pre-order price. According to the new quiet, much is the new little. (also, yes…. really…)

The Peeled Eye
Boris Hauf – baritone saxophone, piano
Steve Heather – drums
Martin Siewert – guitar
Christian Weber – electric bass
link  (w/ audio samples of the upcoming release)

 

April 29 (Wednesday) doors 8pm, show 9pm
ausland, lychener str. 60, 10437 Berlin

May 1 (Friday) 11pm
Ulrichsberger Kaleidophon 2015

“I’ve been trying to find a way for the terror and the beauty to live together in one song. I know it’s possible.” Sonny Sharrock

thanks and all the best,
Boris

round the creep of the wave line

Florasonic-HaufJackson-leadimg574
What you’ll hear in the Fern Room is Round the creep of the wave line by composers and musicians Boris Hauf and Keefe Jackson. For this collaboration, the composers considered the materials and elements in the Fern Room—soil, metal, glass and sunlight—in parallel to the materials and elements of the saxophones and clarinets they play—wood, metal, plastic and breath. Combining their instruments with recordings of plants growing, and incorporating long silences and subtle phrasing, they composed separate tracks of different lengths for each loudspeaker. The result is that the sound combinations are always different, so the piece grows and changes organically and unpredictably, much like the plants in the Fern Room.

Exhibition hours: DAILY, 9:00AM-5:00PM

Opening Reception:Sunday, February 1, 3-5pm

Fern Room, Lincoln Park Conservatory 2391 N. Stockton Drive

FREE ADMISSION

About the artists
Boris Hauf is a composer and multi-instrumentalist who lives and works in Berlin. He has composed for large and small ensembles, performance art, radio, video, and installation. Since 1999 he has regularly collaborated with many Chicago musicians.

Keefe Jackson is a reed player and composer wo is a key member of Chicago’s vibrant improvised music scene— as such he regularly collaborates with many local and visiting musicians. A respect for traditional forms combined with adventurous experimentation exemplifies his approach to saxophone and clarinet.

Genesis of round the creep of the wave line

Science has shown that entire forests are all interconnected by networks of fungi. ‘Maybe plants are using fungi the way we use the Internet and sending acoustic signals through this Web.’
‘[…]Plants can recognize when a good neighbor is growing next to them,’ says Monica Gagliano, evolutionary ecologist at the University of Western Australia. ‘[…] this communication may be based upon an acoustic exchange.’

Drawing upon Hauf’s and Jackson’s extensive assortment of saxophones and clarinets, using their natural timbral varitations based on the overtone series, together with sampled sounds (especially those of plants growing, amplified) and synthesized sounds, and processing them both by both digital and analog methods. Then mixing these at first seemingly disparate elements all together, and finding a ‘whole’ — but instead of trying to impose an artificial order or a narrative structure, allowing the man-made and natural sounds to co-exist and co-mingle with the experience of the actual ferns and the humidity in the Conservatory. An especially important aspect of this will be the quiet spaces and silences that are a natural compliment to winter weather.

Sunlight, glass and steel; humidity, soil and concrete; water, rubber and copper: the physical elements (inanimate) at play in growing ferns, beside the ferns (animate) themselves.
Wind, brass, and wood; aluminum, copper and plastic: the physical elements (inanimate) at play in growing sounds, beside the sounds (animate) themselves.

In experiencing this piece the audience is invited to take a position to ask: At what point do the animate and the inanimate reverse roles?

Using live reed instruments, recordings of the sounds of plants growing, amplifying and ornamenting the natural sounds of plants, 4 channel analog and digital processing, Boris Hauf and Keefe Jackson blur the lines between these at-first-glance disparate elements – illuminate the similarities and differences of the creative processes occurring betwixt and amongst the plants and the recordings.

During the process of creating the piece, a similar approach will be taken toward combining the individual contributions: in using the recordings, editing and processing them, and finally arranging the sounds throughout the Fern Room an attempt will be made to bring these decisions forth by working together not through a traditional artistic collaborative effort or the type of teamwork espoused by workplace efficiency experts, but by following the trajectories of the creative and reductive impulses and organizing things with the least amount of ‘intervention’ possible, to imitate the process of the plants’ growth.

what moves moves – this weekend @ Uferstudios, Berlin

schiefe huetteWe, who live in the world of reflected light, in visual space, may also be said to be in a state of hypnosis. Ever since the collapse of the oral tradition in early Greece, before the age of Parmenides, Western civilization has been mesmerized by a picture of the universe as a limited container in which all things are arranged according to the vanishing point, in a linear geometric order. The intensity of this conception is such that it actually leads to the abnormal suppression of hearing and touch in some individuals…. most of the information we rely upon comes through our eyes; our technology is arranged to heighten that effect: such is the power of Euclidean or visual space that we can’t live with a circle unless we square it.
(Marshall McLuhan, Visual and Acoustic Space)

“our dialogue for this piece started as a conversation about differences and similarities in the perception of aesthetics in dance and in music. using a space within a space we examine dynamics of sound and movement and attempt to balance the two media and their reception.”

what moves moves is the second collaboration of musician/composer Boris Hauf and dancer/choreographer Christina Ciupke. The piece was premiered at the ”Heizhaus” of Uferstudios Berlin in December 2013.

A concrete physical object – a wooden hut (2m x 1,20m x 2m) with no windows – is located on a slight diagonal axis in the middle of the space.The audience enters into a relatively dark space. To perceive the hut from different perspectives, distances and on various sensual levels spectators are welcome to move freely in the space outside the hut. After they have settled the hut gradually develops a life of its own. Visually impenetrable, the hut’s limited permeability allows only minimal perception of what is originating from inside it. Barely perceptible noise, cracks and vibrations reveal the hut’s inner life.

After a while the outside space darkens increasingly and light penetrates the cracks of the wooden structure. Nearing the hut eludes the overview of what is going on inside it, the gaze is drawn to the detail. Observing from a distance complements the visual cutouts and allows insights as a whole. Sound fragments and light movements inside the hut are perceived as physical dynamics and melody fragments can be heard in interstices of building and construction noise.


As performers, Christina Ciupke and Boris Hauf are alternately inside the hut and outside of the enclosed structure, in midst of the audience. The perception of interior and exterior space oscillates with the movement of sound, light and the dynamics between audience and performers. Encounters, when they occur, are indirect and delicate. By repeatedly becoming permeable for the senses the apparently distinct demarcation of the hut conveys proximity and connectedness.


links: mehdi, christina

performance: christina ciupke, boris hauf
light: mehdi toutain-lopez
stage construction: bodo herrmann
costumes: nina kramer
production manager: barbara greiner
assistant: anne schuh
a production by christina ciupke
supported by the berlin senate cultural affairs department

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music for arditti

Morgen ist es so weit: das Arditti Quartet führt mein Stück ‘music for ardtitti’ im Rahmen von musikprotokoll 2014 ur auf. Für alle die nicht in Graz sind gibts am Montag 20. Okt 23h das Ganze im zeitton als webstream.

english:

I’ve been looking forward to this all year:

the amazing Arditti Quartet will be premiering my piece ‘music for arditti’ tomorrow Friday October 10, 2014 at musikprotokoll 2014 in the Helmut List Halle in Graz, Austria.

If you’re around for the festival, please stop by. The concert is at 9:30pm. Unfortunately the majority of you won’t be able to attend the show, but fear not: you’ll have a chance to catch it per webstream on Monday October 20, 11pm CET on zeitton. That’s 4pm CST (looking at you Chicago), 2pm on the West coast (“awesome, thanks Boris!“), 10pm in the UK and midnight in Athens, and 10AM the next day for my bro in New Zealand

And finally – for the brave and bold – for there’ll be a live Q&A on Saturday 10am. Live, as in, you can actually attend the thing on the Murinsel or it’s live broadcast here: klassiktreffpunkt

thanks for your attention. I’m pretty excited.

 

THINGAMAJIG

How is the theatrical experience created? For performers and the audience alike, physical activity and exertion are requirements. Based on this theory, Thingamajig sets out to examine the interplay between the movements of sitting and watching, together with the working body in motion. A choreography emerges, in which observing is considered participation and where the dancers are set in motion by the resistance and overlapping between dance and work. At the end both the performers and audience will leave the theater as if it would have been the oeuvre itself.

ARTISTIC DIRECTION Martin Nachbar
DANCE, CHOREOGRAFY Philipp Enders, Coralie Meinguet, Benjamin Pohlig, Jochen Roller, Sunniva Vikør Egenes
COACHING Jan Burkhardt
DRAMATURGY Valto Kuuluvaineny
MUSIC Boris Hauf
LIGHT Bruno Pocheron
COSTUMES Marion Montel
COMPANY MANAGEMENT Susanne Beyer
PRODUCTION ASSISTENCE Dino Spiri

DATES OCTOBER 02, 03, 04, 05 at 19:30

LOCATION FESTSAAL

TICKETS
14/9 EURO

http://www.sophiensaele.com/produktionen.php?IDstueck=1258&hl=en

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