DO LESS MORE OFTEN

Bed is Boris Hauf and Michael Hartman – Do Less More Often is the music they made. This music is about finding a path through the mundaneness of the day-to-day to create purpose and meaning. It is about finding a meaningful way to pass the time, making music with your friends. There are mostly synthesizers, there are subtle pulses and pounding beats, there are gentle drones and harsh noises, there is light and dark, and there is a way to stay connected across distance, time, and clutter. There is the optimism of family and friendship pushing against the cynicism of the oligarchy.

Original release was accompanied by a T-shirt release here.
T-shirt design by Julian Lars Gosper, printed on Next Level Apparel shirts which are produced environmentally friendly, and sweat-shop and child labor free.

Go to shamelessrecords.rocks for the 8 remaining Ts…

Thanks and enjoy.

VIDEO BY Andrew Jarvis

CLARK2 review on SALT PEANUTS by Eyal Hareuveni

CLARK is the electronica alter ego of Berlin-based experimental sound artist and multi-instrumentalist Boris Hauf since 2005 when he released his debut Clark album (originally on Sijis, re-released by Hauf’s label Shameless Rocks in 2016). «CLARK2» is more ambitious in its concept, scope, and instrumentation, lasting about 80 minutes. This album is released on Hauf’s label as a deluxe double LP on white vinyl (with download option). It is produced at an ECO-friendly factory with green, sustainable biomass driven technology and green power. Hauf promises only carbon-neutral shipping or delivering personally the LPs by bike or tram.

«CLARK2» began as a single LP with Hauf’s «notions of the terrestrial present an extraterrestrial future. It’s about digital natives born into climate collapse and automation, the degree to which we relinquish control to avoid work, and the future that lies ahead of us and our children». Hauf wanted that «CLARK2» pieces would radiate metaphysical, transitional, and phenomenological interactive dimensions. During Hauf correspondence with his graphic designer, Vancouver-based Julian Lars Gosper, this single LP kept growing, referred to the Covid-19 pandemic reality, and shaped in an epic and symphonic form and structure.

The opening piece «Island Destiny» emphasizes the epic, symphonic atmosphere of this album, referencing the extended, layered works of seminal seventies space-rock and early electronics artists like Tangerine Dream, Vangelis, and Peter Michael Hamel, but with an updated, minimalist touch and newer effects that color this piece with sparse, distant mechanical noises. The following pieces are shorter and employ the vintage, analog synthesizer qualities for creating the familiar repetitive, cyclical patterns, then mutating and shaping these basic celestial patterns, enhancing them by extensive usage of effects, often disturbed by subtle scratching, glitches that alter their moods (check the melancholic and pandemic-related «Can’t Get Jobs» and «Murmur», for example). The brief «Humans» (check the accompanying video-clips below created by Thomas Binder-Reisinger) and «Kastri» sound as informed by minimalist techno patterns while the song-like «A Place Not Infinite» corresponds with the eighties kind of heavy and grandiose synth school of Jean Michel Jarre (and Hauf already performed it before with different drummers). This celestial, addictive journey is concluded with the elegiac «Chaos Children», disturbed by urban, monotonous noises.

Eyal Hareuveni

Q&A for Chain D.L.K.

Recently released on his own label Shameless Productions, CLARK2 is the “longest, deeper and more epic” sequel of CLARK (released in 2005). Besides the hypotheses and the precise analysis by our collaborator Stuart Bruce, we decided to have a talk with this brilliant Berlin-based forger of thought-provoking and imagination-boosting electronic music.

Chain D.L.K.: Good morning, Boris! How are you? How are you spending these weird days?

Boris Hauf: Hi, thanks for the call. I‘m honored. Personally, I love being home and with the family. The slowing down of life, in general, is very welcome. Overall though, it’s pretty scary. It would be ideal if humans could learn from this experience: re-evaluating current healthcare and education systems, developing alternatives to capitalism and finally taking climate change more seriously, for instance.

Boris Hauf ‘CLARK2’ cover artwork by Julian Lars Gosper

Chain D.L.K.: You’re displaying some words and reviews on Clark that often quote dystopia. Do you think that your sound could stay with dystopia if you think we’re experiencing a dystopian world?

Boris Hauf: The concept of CLARK2 was about notions of the terrestrial present and extraterrestrial future. It’s about digital natives born into climate collapse and automation, the degree to which we relinquish control to avoid work, and the future that lies ahead of us and our children. The included layer of the pandemic reality is a timely addition. Titles and concept are all ante-corona. I come up with CLARK titles together with my Shameless companion, Julian Gosper, who lives and works in Vancouver and does all the Shameless artwork. Our claim is that a subtle nod in naming may create deep resonance with audiences.

Chain D.L.K.: Can you talk about the project Clark and how its second act related to the first act? Would you say it’s an enhancement, a sort of implementation, or what?

Boris Hauf: CLARK has been my electronica alter ego since 2005. So hopefully both enhancement and implementation. CLARK1 (Shameless, 2016) was a re-issue of a solo I made in 2005 for the UK label Sijis. My studio skills were different back then and so was the compositional focus. The 2016 remix, remaster, and re-titling were informed by fantasies of extraterrestrial pasts. Super weird fun fact: track #6 is called Corona. CLARK2 (2020) was recorded over a much longer time period, with different instruments in a different studio in different times.

courtesy of Frank Mueller

Chain D.L.K.: ‘Island Destinity’…what a great opener! It looks like the rendering of some cosmic reverie. What did you have in mind while composing it? Any word about the equipment and settings you used to forge such an awesome suite?

Boris Hauf: Thanks! “Island Destinity” was the last track I composed for CLARK2. The album originally started off as a single LP. After spending some time with the finished tracks it felt like it was missing a counterweight…the first part. I was drawn to the idea of the opener being something epic and symphonic in form and structure. What makes the piece special in my ears is the breath and pacing.
Mentally and emotionally, I redefined the already finished work as an LP2 of a double album and sent Julian an idea for an LP1. He started working away on the artwork. There was a lot of going back and forth between us. The music informed the artwork and vice versa. It’s always like that in our collaborations.
Regarding equipment: Synths, samplers, and heaps of outboard effect boxes.
In terms of production, I learned a lot from these past years as keyboarder and multi-instrumentalist for the legendary Austrian indie rock band Naked Lunch. Recording with and peeking over the shoulders of artists producing on that level has been very inspiring also for my own production techniques.

Chain D.L.K.: We can’t help but agree with the eco-friendly choices for the promotion of the album…are they somehow related to the concept of the album?

Boris Hauf: Yes, it’s a substantial part of the album concept. And, also the direction I am taking the label. If possible I deliver the LPs in person, by bike or tram. If not I’ll ship it eco-friendly, carbon neutral. I am very happy to have found a pressing plant that also works to these standards.

Chain D.L.K.: We know, and we appreciate you as a very polyhedral sound artist and musician! Which role would you assign to Clark and its sequel in your artistic growth?

Boris Hauf: Polyhedral, I like it. Thanks. As I mentioned before – CLARK is my electronica solo “persona”. It’s an essential part of my work and evolution as musician.

Chain D.L.K.: Both in Clark and Clark2, there’s a strong stylistic connection to evergreen glories of 70s electronic music knights as well as a strong conceptual hook to sci-fi sonorities…how do you relate to 70s electronics and sci-fi?

Boris Hauf: I love that stuff, in all its complexities as much as in its simplicities. Clark2 sounds even more like 70s electronica when you listen to it on vinyl. I was really pleasantly surprised by the similarities when I first heard the test pressings.

‘Mirrorism’ (music: Boris Hauf, video: Thomas Binder-Reisinger, taken from CLARK2, Shameless Records, SHLP07)

Chain D.L.K.: Besides ‘Island Destinity’, whose length justifies it covering the whole A-side, are there any grouping criteria of tracks for their placement on particular sides?

Boris Hauf: The sequencing is something I worked on in close collaboration with my amigo Max McCormick (also mentioned on the album cover). The idea was to create some type of unity with what we perceived as the three different layers going on in the tracks: 1. metaphysical 2. transitional 3. phenomenological interactive. Max wove the layers together in a pattern and we were both quite blown away by the sequence that emerged.

Chain D.L.K.: Is there any track that you reforged many times before the final editing? If so, why?

Boris Hauf: Almost 33% of the tracks were played as are and just needed some tweaking. 33% experienced some detailed production work and 33% were literally “reforged” (great word) – because they needed it. 

courtesy of Frank Mueller & Julian Lars Gosper

Chain D.L.K.: The track entitled ‘Humans’ is the one richest in glitches… I guess it’s not a random choice! :)

Boris Hauf: :)

Chain D.L.K.: With regard to the match between sometimes weird titles and sonic content, what can you say of ‘Can’t Get Jobs’ or ‘A Palace Not Infinite’?

Boris Hauf: The path to matching titles and sonic content had various trajectories (construing titles with Julian and bouncing off his artwork, sequencing strategies together with Max, …) so it’s hard for me to say exactly how those two combinations came up.

Chain D.L.K.: Did you perform or are you going to perform Clark2 on live stages? If yes, are you thinking of some visual content as well?

Boris Hauf: I’ve performed “A Palace Not Infinite” many times on stage. Usually with guest musicians, always drummers. Steve Heather, Morton Olsen, Didi Kern, … to name a few.

I was invited to perform CLARK2 in its entirety at the 2020 Vienna Popfest. It would have been bombastic. Such a shame it can’t happen. The marvellous Katharina Ernst would have been my duo partner for that gig.

The other plan that fell through in summer 2020 was to tour Europe eco-friendly by train and only play house concerts at friend’s places.

Thomas Binder-Reisinger has made some wonderful videos for both CLARK releases, so I am planning to use them in live performances.

‘Humans’ (music: Boris Hauf, video: Thomas Binder-Reisinger, taken from CLARK2, Shameless Records, SHLP07)

Chain D.L.K.: Any work in progress?

Boris Hauf: There are ideas for CLARK3, particularly in enhancing the collaborative aspects. But honestly, I find the whole Corona pandemic thing less inspiring than the tons of emails I get telling me that “now’s the time to be creative”. I’m really happy I had so many projects and releases lined up to help me stay focused and busy throughout this time of immobility, ’cause right now – I’m not feeling crazy creative…

Visit artists’ webspace here: hauf.klingt.org

https://shamelessrocks.bandcamp.com/album/clark2

https://www.chaindlk.com/interviews/boris-hauf/

https://www.chaindlk.com/author/vitocamarretta/

CLARK2

Released mid (first) lockdown my latest full length double LP solo release has been getting a lot of love. thanks for all the support. 

“Admirable excursion that contemplates half a century of electronics of terrestrial and sidereal environments in eighty minutes”
– BlowUpMagazine

“If time looked like music, it could be close to Boris Hauf’s new album, CLARK2. The 12 titles are an immersion in a space suspended from the celestial arches of a universe larger than our imagination.
– Roland Torres

“All this scratchin’ is making me glitch.”
-Kevin Press

“It’s rare that a single album in one style can justify and maintain an 80-minute duration, especially one with such a minimalist approach as this has at times- but it’s a testament to the balance and control that’s been put into this that it really is worthy of it. It’s filmic and grandiose, yet never over the top. Brace yourself for a beautiful musical deep space science fiction adventure on this one.”
– Stuart Bruce

“I don’t know, it makes my eyes hurt.”
– Naima

Building A Better Reality: A Benefit Compilation

The recent killings of and the ongoing state-sanctioned violence against people of colour in the US and around the world are horrific tragedies. This Juneteenth (June 19) Bandcamp will donate 100% of their share of sales to the NAACP Legal Defense Fund, a national organization that has a long history of effectively enacting racial justice and change through litigation, advocacy, and public education. Juneteenth is an American holiday commemorating the emancipation of the last remaining enslaved African Americans in 1865. Brent Gutzeit is releasing a compilation I’m very proud to be a part of. All proceeds go to BLM, NAACP and the Greater Chicago Food Depository.

I mean, check out the bonkers line up already.

Building A Better Reality: A Benefit Compilation
A benefit for BLM, NAACP Legal Defense Fund and The Greater Chicago Food Depository
Release date: June 19, 2020
Label: JMY – https://jmymusic.bandcamp.com/album/building-a-better-reality-a-benefit-compilation

line up: CASEY RICE, MICHAEL ZERANG, FRANCISCO MEIRINO, THEO KATSAOUNIS, BORIS HAUF (exspiro), DREKKA, PaVda (HAL RAMMEL/LINDA BINDER), MARC RIORDAN, OUR WRONGS (Kenny Sanderson/Adam Jennings), LEIF ELGGREN, AL MARGOLIS, KAREN CONSTANCE AND BLUE SPECTRUM, FIRE-TOOLZ, JESSE GOIN, EMIL BEAULIEAU, TV POW, DAVE REMPIS/TOMEKA REID/JOSH ABRAMS TRIO, DOLINE KARST, BEN VIDA, PBK, TV POW (Featuring Sharkula, Precise & Ben Carter), RAGLANI, NICK MAZZARELLA and TOMEKA REID, PAVLOS VAKALOS & NICOLAS MALEVITSIS, DARIN GRAY, PHARMAKUSTIK, K2 (Kimihide Kusafuka), TIJUANA HERCULES, CHRIS HERBERT, MATT LUX’S COMMUNICATION ARTS QUARTET, RAINBOW NOTHING (Plastic Crimewave/Andrew Paine), KEN VANDERMARK, JESSE KUDLER, GABIE STRONG, KEITH FULLERTON WHITMAN, WEASEL WALTER, JIM DORLING, IAN FRASER, SARAH HENNIES, BEN CARTER, , EMMETT KELLY (Cairo Gang), SIGTRYGGUR BERG SIGMARSSON, FRED LONBERG-HOLM, ZOOTS HOUSTON, CHRIS BROKAW, KATHERINE YOUNG, JASON ROEBKE, THE SINGLEMAN AFFAIR, BEN BILLINGTON (Quicksails), JIM BECKER, ANDREW SCOTT YOUNG, RYAN WEINSTEIN, GX JUPITER LARSEN, DAN FANDINO, RUNAR MAGNUSSON, TIM KINSELLA, PRECISE, J. SOLIDAY, JULIAN KIRSHNER, SIMON JOYNER, TIMOTHY RENNER (Stone Breath), DJ DOUGGPOUND, MYKEL BOYD, DREAS, CINCHEL, CHRIS POTTINGER, MICHAEL GENDREAU, VADIM SPRIKUT (Drowned), BENJAMIN, JEB BISHOP, FRED WELLS (I Kong Kult), NICK HOFFMAN, HEIKKI RUOKANGAS, MIKE BULLOCK, MATT SCHNEIDER (Moon Bros), SAM WAGSTER, BRIAN LABYCZ, KAZUYA ISHIGAMI, LASSE MARHAUG, JOSH ABRAMS, TODD MATTEI, BRENDAN MURRAY, CRANK STURGEON, AITIS BAND, KENDRA AMALIE, WILLIAM TYLER, JIM BAKER

Happy Record Release Day

2 new releases coming your way:

CLARK2

Boris Hauf
2 white LPs in gatefold
Music by Boris Hauf at Lost Collie, Berlin
Mastered by Todd Carter at bel_Air, Chicago
Design by Julian Lars Gosper, Vancouver
Many thanks to Max McCormick
Supported by ske-fond.at

“It’s rare that a single album in one style can justify and maintain an 80-minute duration, especially one with such a minimalist approach as this has at times- but it’s a testament to the balance and control that’s been put into this that it really is worthy of it. It’s filmic and grandiose, yet never over the top. It’s a modern take on the halcyon 70’s days of experimental electronic music, with a few fresh details, and it’s executed brilliantly.”
– Stuart Bruce

“If time looked like music, it could be close to CLARK2. The 12 titles are an immersion in a space suspended from the celestial arches of a universe larger than our imagination.”
– Roland Torres

“I don’t know, it makes my eyes hurt.”
– Naima

CLARK2 is produced at an ECO friendly factory with green, sustainable bio-mass driven technology and green power. We offer carbon neutral shipping only or deliver our LPs in person by bike. No shrinkwrap. No physical promo.

DO LESS MORE OFTEN

BED (Michael Hartmann & Boris Hauf)
T Shirt and download

composed, recorded, mixed, mastered, paid for by Michael Hartman & Boris Hauf
T-shirt design by Julian Lars Gosper

Bed is Boris Hauf and Michael Hartman – Do Less More Often is the music they made. This music is about finding a path through the mundaneness of the day-to-day to create purpose and meaning. It is about finding a meaningful way to pass the time, making music with your friends. There are mostly synthesizers, there are subtle pulses and pounding beats, there are gentle drones and harsh noises, there is light and dark, and there is a way to stay connected across distance, time, and clutter. There is the optimism of family and friendship pushing against the cynicism of the oligarchy.

All proceeds from t-shirt sales minus bandcamp, paypal and shipping fees will be donated to The Greater Chicago Food Depository (Chicago sales) and Berliner Tafel e.V. (Berlin sales) to help feed people during these strange times.Our T-shirts printed on Next Level Apparel shirts which are produced environmentally friendly, and sweat-shop and child labor free.


CLARK2 sneak peek #1

Hello friend,

I hope you and yours are all well in these intense and super weird times.

The idea was to release CLARK2 in late April 2020 and then travel through Europe to play house-concert type private record release shows. Well, that won’t happen. Still not sure how I’ll ‘present’ the record but will keep you updated via this channel.

In the mean time I have some wonderful videos to share with you over the next weeks. All by the amazing Thomas Binder-Reisinger.

Thanks for your time,
Boris

““Mirrorism” has more than a shade of early Tangerine Dream about it, revelling in gradually unfolding analogue synth arpeggiations that are dizzying at first then blossom into a new calm- the sound of a composer with a great deal of understanding both technical and emotional.” – Stuart Bruce

Music: Boris Hauf
Video: Thomas Binder-Reisinger

Album: CLARK2, Shameless Records, SHLP07
2 White Vinyl LPs in Gatefold Cover

Street date: April 24, 2020

Pre-order: clark2.shamelessrecords.rocks

benefit release

OWL & MACK

In light of the dystopian humanitarian crisis in the Aegean region Shameless Records is releasing a benefit album.

All proceeds of this album go directly to the Greek NGO Infomobile, providing refugees with information concerning their rights in Greece and Europe. Infomobile offers legal advise through street work, printed guides and social media, and in individual cases strategic legal and humanitarian aid. They document human rights violations and publish reports to create awareness in the civil society, to increase political pressure for change and establish new tools for legal aid before authorities and courts.

To the European leaders we say:
STOP THE BORDER DEATHS!
STOP RACIST POLICIES AND VIOLENCE!
OPEN THE BORDERS!

Beautiful

“It’s been more than 10 years since we had not talked about Boris Hauf and we would almost regret not having followed his path a little closer, especially since this production is not really a novelty. Indeed, Boris Hauf has already released an album called Clark, published in 2006 by the Sijis label which is a kind of reissue that is the opportunity to move from CDr to vinyl and republish this record on his own label, Shameless Records. By cons it is a rough reissue since we go from 7 to 6 tracks, most songs have changed titles, and duration. Here is the updated and remastered version of Clark.

The disc opens with Fantods on a kind of deep bass and cracklings, a brief abstract introduction before going on to small regular metal hits that form a minimal rhythm. The musician enriches his composition with new elements (bass, squeaks) to form a more complete rhythm, in a minimal style that drifts in his last third to sounds a little more industrial.
Most elements of the album are already laid. Even in its construction, Mind Tapes takes again the format of this first title with a rather catchy minimal rhythm, crossed by small wriggling before ending on an explosion of granular textures. To listen to it, we must be able to guess that it is not a recent production: if the groove is still there, effective, the choice of sounds may betray the age of this production, especially on No Stop Flight whose oscillating drone makes us think of a didgeridoo before continuing on bass pulsations.

The second part of the album is an opportunity to test other things, including Le Chien, one of the highlights of this album and probably the title closest to the original album. This is a pure minimal electro subtly destructured, evolving on the end towards a particularly binary techno. Another nice surprise, the electro-ambient of Violet Moon, crossing of drone and breath which abandons itself in weightlessness, on slow melodic jingles. Beautiful !
We end with the extreme minimalism of Corona, its bass pulsations punctuated by places of sizzling textures and electronic.

A very pleasant album of a minimal and intelligent electro.”

Fabrice Allard, EtherREAL Webzine

http://www.etherreal.com/spip.php?article5863

psst… get your copy copy here

More Postmarks reviews. Feelin the love. Thanks all!

All About Jazz

The duo Postmarks consists of London-born Austrian saxophonist Boris Hauf and the Chicago-based American pianist D Bayne. Their first CD Western Ave (Luminescence, 2005) was a limited-edition of only one hundred copies packaged in unique covers, each a handcrafted collage from twenties Chicago postcards. For National Parks, the duo went to Vienna to record with experimental guitarist Martin Siewert, maybe best known for his work with Trapist or in Hauf’s Efzeg. The outlines for the ten pieces the three recorded were composed by Hauf and Bayne, and inspired by U.S. national parks and their representation on posters from the thirties and forties.

Without veering too close to programme music, the pieces clearly display the influence of the material that inspired them. They are gently melodious and have a mellow tranquillity that is easy on the ear without risking becoming soporific. Occasionally there are traces that the two have been mindful of the thirties/forties origins of the posters, most obviously in Hauf’s sax work. For instance, his rising phrase that opens “Hubbell Trading Post at dusk” sounds borrowed from the big band era and will have many listeners racking their brains for its inspiration. Three of the pieces appear in two versions—distinguished as “at dawn” and “at dusk”—and comparison of these reveal that the compositions are not prescriptive but allow the players considerable leeway for interpretation and improvisation, to the extent that—at over eleven minutes—”Hubbell Trading Post at dawn” is over twice the length of “Hubbell Trading Post at dusk.”

As the inspiration for the music was a combination of nature (the parks) and nostalgia (the posters), the choice of Siewert as a guest player with the duo was an intriguing one, maybe signaling that Hauf and Bayne were seeking to avoid the music becoming overly pastoral or nostalgic. If that was the intention, Siewert—with his minimalist style and use of electronics—was a good choice to help steer the music clear of such things. In practice, Siewert plays a typically understated role, contributing just enough coloration to brand this as twenty-first century music; for instance his judicious injections of electronic noise clearly brand it as neither pastoral nor nostalgic. An inspired choice by Postmarks.

– John Eyles

The Wire

The beautifully designed digital collages that adorn this release, each reworking elements of 1920s posters advertising American national parks, apparently inspired musical outlines for the eight pieces here. Postmarks are the pianist D Bayne and the saxophonist Boris Hauf, who on this, their second album, are joined in places by the Viennese guitar experimentalist Martin Siewert. On the whole these are slow, moodily beautiful piano and sax improvisations, with Bayne’s forthright, oftener minimally repetitive piano providing a framework over which Hauf drifts smoky, semi-melodic lines. Siewert’s contributions are few and far between, but add an abstract electronic coloring that does just enough to keep the album, away form middle ground jazziness. Difficult to firmly categorizes, National Parks often veers close to tuneful politeness but retains an atonal edge throughout that undermines everything and provides a nervous and intriguing quality to the music.
– The Wire

freejazzblog

We like the music of saxophonist Boris Hauf, as can be read on previous reviews here. On these albums Hauf demonstrated his skill to create a sonic mood, a coherent environment sculpted with sound. On “National Parks” he is accompanied by D Bayne on piano and by Martin Siewert on guitar.

The music is inspired by the posters for US national parks from the 1930s and 1940s, which strangely add the dual color of evocating nature, while at the same time coloring with sentiments of bygone days.

The music is quiet, well-paced, subtle, beautiful, not cheerful but also not really sad, but rather solemn and light-hearted, if that is possible, and then Siewert draws a solid nail through the musical poster, ripping every sentiment of comfort you may have had.

Some of the tracks are real miniatures, short often minimalist pieces full of finesse and interesting playing, and they are as good as the longer pieces, which are on the second part of the album, with more room to develop the ideas while at the same time allowing for more emotional depth.

In a way you could qualify the music as free jazz impressionism, because of its concept and its accessibility and obvious beauty on the surface level, yet at the same time, the music remains open-ended, like nothing is definitive, with more abstract threads of sounds left unraveled, as if there is a question mark behind it all, and with some darker undercurrents, something fearful and unexplained, mayby unexplainable, hidden in the invisible parts of the scenes yet present, or with traces of the past somehow still lingering, only to be caught with sound, with repetitive arpeggios, slightly bending notes on the sax and screeching guitar sounds.
– Stef

freistil

On “National Parks” Postmarks reflect upon the appearance of various U.S. national parks and their representation on posters of the 1930s and 40s. Still, even without this background knowledge, the extemporization of this classic sax/piano line-up is impeccable.

Auf “National Parks” reflektieren Postmarks das Erscheinungsbild diverser US-Nationalparks unter Berücksichtigung ihrer Darstellung auf Plakaten der 1930er und 40er Jahre. Dieser inhaltliche Background spiegelt sich freilich in einem Saxofon-Klavier-Duo höchstens rudimentär wider, wenn überhaupt. Und auch ohne das Wissen darum funktioniert die Extemporierung der klassischen Besetzung hinaus ins freie Feld tadellos.
– felix freistil.klingt.org

MORE REVIEWS

Postmarks National Parks reviews

The beautifully designed digital collages that adorn this release, each reworking elements of 1920s posters advertising American national parks, apparently inspired musical outlines for the eight pieces here. Postmarks are the pianist D Bayne and the saxophonist Boris Hauf, who on this, their second album, are joined in places by the Viennese guitar experimentalist Martin Siwert. On the whole these are slow, moodily beautiful piano and sax improvisations, with Bayne’s forthright, oftener minimally repetitive piano providing a framework over which Hauf drifts smoky, semi-melodic lines. Siewert’s contributions are few and far between, but add an abstract electronic coloring that does just enough to keep the album, away form middle ground jazziness. Difficult to firmly categorizes, National Parks often veers close to tuneful politeness but retains an atonal edge throughout that undermines everything and provides a nervous and intriguing quality to the music.
– The Wire

Blow Up
Boris Hauf (saxophones) and D Bayne (piano) are Postmarks – assisted here by guitarist Marin Siewert who superimposes a layer of static electricity in intimate dialogue with the acoustic instruments. Inspired by America’s national parks and the way in which they were represented on postcards of the 30s, the album is full of lyrical passages that enhance a sound material organized with rigor and intelligence. (7)
– M. Busti, Blow Up

monsieur delire (Francois Couture)
Second CD from Postmarks – pianist D Bayne and sax player Boris Hauf (ex-Efzeg, among other projects) – with guest Martin Siewert on guitar and electronics. Delicate, thoughtful, quiet improvisations (they were in part pre-planned from what I understand), rich in abstraction. From time to time, an electronic tone cuts through, allowing the listener to refocus his attention, which tends to start wandering during this record. Not entirely convincing, but an interesting release.
–monsieurdelire

Le son de grisli
They are inspired by maps Americans national parks published in the 1930s and 1940s – to each his scores – saxophonist Boris Hauf and pianist D Bayne made ​​the trip to Vienna for Martin Siewert recorded their project – the Austrian may also intervene on guitar or electronics. A slow saxophone, timid and defeats piano notes and feedback Tension: So much for the opening ballad disgrace what Bandelier National, which does not communicate its nonchalance parts which follow. Is that the pianist has decided otherwise: borrowed, that he abuses Accessories interventions, arpeggios harped or leaks without ideas. And as Hauf follows suit while Siewert is not far from silent, we are eager to finish.
Le son de grisli (Guillaume Belhomme)

new release: Postmarks – National Parks (Vinyl and CD)

Postmarks is a duo with saxophonist Boris Hauf and pianist D Bayne. Their first album Western Ave was recorded in Chicago (2005) and released as a limited- edition CD on Luminescence Records. The 100 copies were packaged in unique covers, each a handcrafted collage from 1920s Chicago postcards by T. Kellers of STUDIO TWELVE 3. For National Parks, Hauf and Bayne went to Vienna, Austria to record with guitar-experimentalist Martin Siewert. Musical outlines for the pieces were inspired by U.S. national parks and their representation in iconic posters from the 1930s and 1940s.

2013 on Montotype Records

Postmarks – National Parks
Boris Hauf (baritone & tenor sax) & D Bayne (piano)
special guest: Martin Siewert (guitar, electronics)

all compositions: Boris Hauf (AKM) and D Bayne (BMI)
recorded, mixed and mastered Martin Siewert, Vienna 2012

here are some of the posters we’re talking about:
image001

image002

image003

image004

Ultimately it’s a curiosity that sounds like nothing else.

“[…] On Next Delusion by Berlin-based saxophonist Boris Hauf, […] forms […] an even more unconventional lineup. There can be few instrumentations that are completely novel, but three horns matched with three drumsets recalls few precedents. Waxed on one of the German’s regular trips to Chicago, Hauf has assembled a talented crew, though their abilities are almost totally sublimated to the leader’s offbeat conceptions.
For much of the time, the three percussionists (Frank Rosaly, Steven Hess and Michael Hartman) are so restrained as to be subliminal and the horns (Keefe Jackson, alongside Stein and Hauf) aren’t much more demonstrative. It’s largely impossible to tell who does what in the four tracks, which defy categorization in their execution of Hauf’s austere and rigorous charts. Dissonant unisons and subdued drones characterize the horn lines, which often sound on a parallel but unconnected track to the rumbling massed drums. Ultimately it’s a curiosity that sounds like nothing else.”

John Sharpe
The New York City Jazz Record
NEW YORK’s ONLY HOMEGROWN JAZZ GAZETTE

Boris Hauf Chicago Sextet ‘Next Delusion’ – sound set out in the iris of the eye

original review in croation here.

google translate below…>

Boris Hauf Chicago Sextet ‘Next Delusion’ – sound set out in the iris of the eye

Vienna saxophonist and improviser Boris Hauf, born in 1966. in London, but a decade flirts with the Chicago scene, and its debt to American counterculture recently expressed an homage Levon Helm of The Band.

Boris Hauf Sextet ‘Next Delusion’

Haufov Chicago sextet Next Delusion three wind players and three drummers, in the first series bass clarinetist Jason Stein , and saxophonists Hauf (tenor, baritone) and Keefe Jackson (tenor, bass clarinet), while in the second Frank Rosaly , Michael Hartmann and Steven Hess , respectively drummers.

Connection Chicago and Berlin is not sporadic, because at the time before it was Jeb Bishop left the electric guitar to be devoted entirely to the trombone, Art Institute of Chicago has organized a major event dedicated tuvanskoj singer Sainkho Namtchylak inhabited in Vienna, where the Chicago quartet performing guitarists Werner Daefeldeckera . And judging by the recordings are from 1991. year on YouTube, it seems that it was Boris Taba. Ahead Viennese moving to Berlin at the beginning of the millennium Hauf mapped sound EAI label Durian, Mego, Grave and Extraplatte, along with colleagues from the collectiveKlingt . Electrification of experience gained in the sound texture group Efzeg with Saks, synthesizers and computer harnessed to work with the American trio TV Pow, lap-gunner, in which in addition to a Hartmann opskurnija names.

Sextet moving aesthetic minimalist sound, even before the reductionist, in the introductory “Gregory Grant Machine” frequency point are established from the rainy strikes by cymbals and mikrovizatorskih winds that slowly heat up the intoxicating drone collective timbre spreading aura solar orgasm. In “Eighteen Ghost Roads” suggestive atmosphere is indicated akordnim voicinzima three winds, followed by the massive crowds refined drumming.

In polikromatskoj “Fame and Riches” idea is enshrined in the iris of the eye with a provocative voice, saxophone playing a double role, the soloist and the first one to vote almost chamber orchestra. And although they are invasive in “Wayward Lanes”, the listener is also not required to take care of every detail.Crawl under his skin – that! – Leaving him at a distance to the sound discretion cope.

Rating: 9/10

(Clean Feed, 2012).

Type Jeraj Sundays from 22:00 to 24:00 hours editing and hosting the show ‘Hearing deception’ on Radio 808th

“egos in abeyance and empathy keenly evident” by Jesse Goin

A collision of musicians that on paper might suggest fractious, frantic results, is instead a gestalt of tempered, balanced, largely restrained playing, with egos in abeyance and empathy keenly evident. You can refer to Bill Meyers’ fine liner notes for a run-down of Hauf’s affair with the city, but I do find one aspect of this ensemble’s joined sensibilities of interest. Essentially the Sextet is an encounter between Chicago improvisers of the Umbrella Music Collective (Jason Stein, Keefe Jackson and Rosaly) and musicians associated with (let’s forgo bickering about placeholder names) EAI (Michael Hartman of T.V Pow, Hauf with his Efzeg affiliation, Steven Hess of, among many projects, Haptic). A little research reveals that all of the Sextet came to Chicago, from every direction,between 1999-2001. Efzeg became active in Vienna in 1999, but Hauf began his infatuation with the Midwestern city that year, returning annually, more or less, to this date; Keefe and Rosaly hit the city in 2001; T.V. Pow, as a trio, became active in the city at that time; in other words, the present-day Sextet gathered in Chicago at least 12 years ago, drawn to it as a burgeoning locus for experimental music. That’s one aspect of this collision.

The music at hand owns some of the blurring of individual roles associated with Efzeg or Haptic; the horns often braid and twine together without solos or a foregrounded voice. There are passages where, oddly and refreshingly, the three drummers lay out, opening a World Saxophone Quartet-like space for Stein, Hauf and Jackson’s stacked harmonies. The flip is true as well – one piece finds the percussion rumbling alone, with an admirably tamped-down fire. There are occasional bursts of frenetic reed work, though reigned in and always returning and folding back into the whole.

Somehow – and I count this as no small feat – Hauf has immersed himself for many years in his adopted city, his love for theimprovisation forged there self-evident, without becoming derivative or diluting his own sound and approach. This enables the Sextet to be a strange brew, an authentic collective, remaining horizontal, unimpeded by egos, and able to foment, as they do onNext Delusion, a surprise or two.

Jesse Goin – CROW WITH NO MOUTH

BORIS HAUF SEXTET – NEXT DELUSION

a consistent study of contained tension and contrasts

BORIS HAUF SEXTET, NEXT DELUSION

Boris Hauf is probably still best known as a participant in the Vienna improvising scene of the turn of the millennium, a saxophonist as comfortable in electronically rich environments (like Efzeg) as in micro-improvising. This new sextet music – with Hauf on tenor and soprano, Keefe Jackson on tenor and contrabass clarinet, Jason Stein on bass clarinet, and Frank Rosaly, Steven Hess, and Michael Hartman on drums (Hess also adds electronics) – is a rich amalgam of the two approaches. Next Delusion often sounds as if something of the woody intensity of Gebhard Ullman’s clarinet trio (at least their methodology if not their instrumentation) meets with a percussion sound midway between the spare beats of Martin Brandlmayr and a kind of Paul Lovens bustle. The opening “Gregory Grant Machine” is terrific, moving between sections of Polwechsel’s flinty sparseness and solemn moving chords from low woodwinds, continually dipping in and out of silence. It’s an approach that Hauf favors for this instrumentation, and he uses it even more effectively on “Eighteen Ghost Roads,” whose slow sectional chords rise patiently and deliberately to a stately, ROVA-esque feel before erupting in a threeway percussive rumble that sets up a different context for the same horn movement. There’s plenty of variation on the record, lest you think there are simply different settings for this general approach. Each tune features great attention to tonal / timbral contrast, often pitting high whining feedback against eructations from the lower horns. A burble of reed popping sets the course on “Fame & Riches,” which morphs via woven tones and the gentlest, deftest cymbal work into a sustained hum of an atmosphere. And the closing “Wayward Lanes” races along with a skirling series of bass clarinet patterns wending through a thicket of rimshots. It’s a compelling record, a consistent study of contained tension and contrasts.

Dan Warburton, PT

Mixture of European concepts and American know-how

Fascinated by the minimalist textures revealed by balancing percussion and reed timbres plus an overlay of electronics, Berlin-based saxophonist Boris Hauf convened these telekinetic exercises in collective improvisation during a 2010 busman`s holiday in Chicago.
A frequent visitor to that city, Hauf is best known for his work with the efzeg combo, but these CDs are even more reductionist. Replacing the guitars that were part of efzeg with piano micro-tonalism of one-name Austrian Juun, plus his own harmonium playing on Proxemics, Hauf fills out the juddering narrative with contributions from his tenor and soprano saxophones, Keefe Jackson’s contrabass clarinet and tenor saxophone and Steven Hess’s drum beats. Hess, who is almost prominent in metal bands; Hauf and Jackson, who leads his own band and is a fixture in Chicago FreeBop combos; are all accounted for on Next Delusion with the trio augmented by exploratory Windy City bass clarinetist Jason Stein and two additional drummers: Michael Hartman and Frank Rosaly, both of whom gig frequently on the Chi-town Jazz scene.
In all honesty the discrepancy in the sound density between four or six players is minimal. Both measured and lingering the sextet’s four tracks travel a similar linear path as the three advanced by the quartet. If anything the most audible variation is the prominent reed textures Next Delusion. Often Stein’s bass clarinet, Jackson’s contrabass clarinet and the lower notes from Hauf’s tenor inflate together into an exposition of subterranean-pitched, tugboat-horn-like blowing. At the same time the output is never completely opaque, as split tones, snorts as well as linear air movements are also audible. Although the potential exists for rhythmic heavy-handedness from the three accomplished drummers, instead the percussionists are exemplary in cooperation. For every explosion of united rolls, ruffs and rebounds that upsets the chromatic cohesion, there are many more instances of the kit manipulators limiting themselves to rumbling timbres on drum tops or isolating cymbal claps and splashes.
If there’s a defining track it’s “Fame & Riches”; obviously no reflection of those involved with experimental improvised music. Beginning with reed tongue-slaps, flutters and squeaks, bass clarinet slurps and contrabass clarinet slurs eventually coagulate into a dense, nearly motionless reed mass. Finally meticulously angled saxophone lines and microtonal drum slaps reanimate the sequence.
Similar microtonal, chromatic interface is obvious on Proxemics, even if oscillating and shrill signal processing from Hauf’s sine tone and Hess’s electronics are more obvious. So are individual reed and piano strategies that reference Free Jazz. “Social”, the shortest track, contrasts straightforward tenor saxophone split tones backed by piano comping and drum top spanks. As Juan alternates her output between marimba-like string plucks and tremolo keyboard runs, puffing saxophone and clarinet air expelling maintain the track’s fragile equilibrium. Cascading and continuous harmonium washes on “Personal” similarly bring forth razzing sibilates from Jackson plus strident no-mouthpiece body toots from Hauf’s horn.
This combination of austere friction, moderated lyricism and near-ambient electronic synthesis is expanded to its fullest on the more than 29½ -minute “Public”. While the electronic shimmies often produce an unyielding ostinato as the horn men’s slurs slide into one another, there are still enough obvious jagged edges to keep the track lively. Among the standout signs are Juan’s clattering piano keys and tickling minimalist note patterns; bell-ringing and sequence-shattering from the percussionist’s raps and rolls; plus key percussion, mouthpiece whistling and balanced tongue slaps from the saxophonists.
With a mixture of European concepts and American know-how, Hauf and company maintain individual expression among the harmonies and rhythms of extended group expression. Both sessions make an impression and the textural attribute of either band could be advantageously developed by Hauf for further sound explorations.
Ken Waxman

REVIEWS

Reedman Boris Hauf frequently pushes the envelope. For evidence, one need only look at his longstanding affiliation with the avant-garde, acoustic-electric Austrian band Efzeg, known for subliminal sound-sculpting mechanics and ethereal subtleties. However, his repertoire is quite extensive. Making frequent trips to Chicago over the years, he has aligned with like-minded individuals and noted improvisers, often residing on the same musical plane, similar visions coalescing for unpredictable outcomes. On this release, Hauf merges a three-horn attack with three drummers. Needless to state, the band’s makeup and scope of intent offer abstract permutations amid a keenly inventive platform, where hidden meanings are slowly revealed.

Glenn Astarita

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