Boris Hauf Sextet at Constellation

Berlin-based reedist and composer Boris Hauf has been a regular visitor to Chicago since 1999, developing strong ties with local musicians on his sometimes extended stays. One especially noteworthy product of these collaborations is his sextet, which performs locally tonight for the first time since the 2011 release of its most recent album, Next Delusion (Clean Feed). Hauf leads five local jazz and experimental musicians, combining their aesthetics for a restrained but not minimalist sound that borrows the solo language of free improvisation and the patience of avant-­garde drone. Over four extended pieces, he and fellow reedists Keefe Jackson and Jason Stein play braided long tones and multipitched clusters of percussive pops over a mix of thrumming, scraping textures and ferocious polyrhythms from kit drummers Frank Rosaly, Steven Hess, and Michael Hartman. Few ensembles can match this sextet’s decisive motion among pure sound exploration, carefully harnessed chaos, and meticulously ordered drones.

Peter Margasak

When: Thu., May 28, 8:30 p.m.
Price: $10

Source: Boris Hauf Sextet, Jeph Jerman & Tim Barnes | Constellation | Jazz | Chicago Reader

Ultimately it’s a curiosity that sounds like nothing else.

“[…] On Next Delusion by Berlin-based saxophonist Boris Hauf, […] forms […] an even more unconventional lineup. There can be few instrumentations that are completely novel, but three horns matched with three drumsets recalls few precedents. Waxed on one of the German’s regular trips to Chicago, Hauf has assembled a talented crew, though their abilities are almost totally sublimated to the leader’s offbeat conceptions.
For much of the time, the three percussionists (Frank Rosaly, Steven Hess and Michael Hartman) are so restrained as to be subliminal and the horns (Keefe Jackson, alongside Stein and Hauf) aren’t much more demonstrative. It’s largely impossible to tell who does what in the four tracks, which defy categorization in their execution of Hauf’s austere and rigorous charts. Dissonant unisons and subdued drones characterize the horn lines, which often sound on a parallel but unconnected track to the rumbling massed drums. Ultimately it’s a curiosity that sounds like nothing else.”

John Sharpe
The New York City Jazz Record
NEW YORK’s ONLY HOMEGROWN JAZZ GAZETTE

Boris Hauf Chicago Sextet ‘Next Delusion’ – sound set out in the iris of the eye

original review in croation here.

google translate below…>

Boris Hauf Chicago Sextet ‘Next Delusion’ – sound set out in the iris of the eye

Vienna saxophonist and improviser Boris Hauf, born in 1966. in London, but a decade flirts with the Chicago scene, and its debt to American counterculture recently expressed an homage Levon Helm of The Band.

Boris Hauf Sextet ‘Next Delusion’

Haufov Chicago sextet Next Delusion three wind players and three drummers, in the first series bass clarinetist Jason Stein , and saxophonists Hauf (tenor, baritone) and Keefe Jackson (tenor, bass clarinet), while in the second Frank Rosaly , Michael Hartmann and Steven Hess , respectively drummers.

Connection Chicago and Berlin is not sporadic, because at the time before it was Jeb Bishop left the electric guitar to be devoted entirely to the trombone, Art Institute of Chicago has organized a major event dedicated tuvanskoj singer Sainkho Namtchylak inhabited in Vienna, where the Chicago quartet performing guitarists Werner Daefeldeckera . And judging by the recordings are from 1991. year on YouTube, it seems that it was Boris Taba. Ahead Viennese moving to Berlin at the beginning of the millennium Hauf mapped sound EAI label Durian, Mego, Grave and Extraplatte, along with colleagues from the collectiveKlingt . Electrification of experience gained in the sound texture group Efzeg with Saks, synthesizers and computer harnessed to work with the American trio TV Pow, lap-gunner, in which in addition to a Hartmann opskurnija names.

Sextet moving aesthetic minimalist sound, even before the reductionist, in the introductory “Gregory Grant Machine” frequency point are established from the rainy strikes by cymbals and mikrovizatorskih winds that slowly heat up the intoxicating drone collective timbre spreading aura solar orgasm. In “Eighteen Ghost Roads” suggestive atmosphere is indicated akordnim voicinzima three winds, followed by the massive crowds refined drumming.

In polikromatskoj “Fame and Riches” idea is enshrined in the iris of the eye with a provocative voice, saxophone playing a double role, the soloist and the first one to vote almost chamber orchestra. And although they are invasive in “Wayward Lanes”, the listener is also not required to take care of every detail.Crawl under his skin – that! – Leaving him at a distance to the sound discretion cope.

Rating: 9/10

(Clean Feed, 2012).

Type Jeraj Sundays from 22:00 to 24:00 hours editing and hosting the show ‘Hearing deception’ on Radio 808th

“egos in abeyance and empathy keenly evident” by Jesse Goin

A collision of musicians that on paper might suggest fractious, frantic results, is instead a gestalt of tempered, balanced, largely restrained playing, with egos in abeyance and empathy keenly evident. You can refer to Bill Meyers’ fine liner notes for a run-down of Hauf’s affair with the city, but I do find one aspect of this ensemble’s joined sensibilities of interest. Essentially the Sextet is an encounter between Chicago improvisers of the Umbrella Music Collective (Jason Stein, Keefe Jackson and Rosaly) and musicians associated with (let’s forgo bickering about placeholder names) EAI (Michael Hartman of T.V Pow, Hauf with his Efzeg affiliation, Steven Hess of, among many projects, Haptic). A little research reveals that all of the Sextet came to Chicago, from every direction,between 1999-2001. Efzeg became active in Vienna in 1999, but Hauf began his infatuation with the Midwestern city that year, returning annually, more or less, to this date; Keefe and Rosaly hit the city in 2001; T.V. Pow, as a trio, became active in the city at that time; in other words, the present-day Sextet gathered in Chicago at least 12 years ago, drawn to it as a burgeoning locus for experimental music. That’s one aspect of this collision.

The music at hand owns some of the blurring of individual roles associated with Efzeg or Haptic; the horns often braid and twine together without solos or a foregrounded voice. There are passages where, oddly and refreshingly, the three drummers lay out, opening a World Saxophone Quartet-like space for Stein, Hauf and Jackson’s stacked harmonies. The flip is true as well – one piece finds the percussion rumbling alone, with an admirably tamped-down fire. There are occasional bursts of frenetic reed work, though reigned in and always returning and folding back into the whole.

Somehow – and I count this as no small feat – Hauf has immersed himself for many years in his adopted city, his love for theimprovisation forged there self-evident, without becoming derivative or diluting his own sound and approach. This enables the Sextet to be a strange brew, an authentic collective, remaining horizontal, unimpeded by egos, and able to foment, as they do onNext Delusion, a surprise or two.

Jesse Goin – CROW WITH NO MOUTH

BORIS HAUF SEXTET – NEXT DELUSION

a consistent study of contained tension and contrasts

BORIS HAUF SEXTET, NEXT DELUSION

Boris Hauf is probably still best known as a participant in the Vienna improvising scene of the turn of the millennium, a saxophonist as comfortable in electronically rich environments (like Efzeg) as in micro-improvising. This new sextet music – with Hauf on tenor and soprano, Keefe Jackson on tenor and contrabass clarinet, Jason Stein on bass clarinet, and Frank Rosaly, Steven Hess, and Michael Hartman on drums (Hess also adds electronics) – is a rich amalgam of the two approaches. Next Delusion often sounds as if something of the woody intensity of Gebhard Ullman’s clarinet trio (at least their methodology if not their instrumentation) meets with a percussion sound midway between the spare beats of Martin Brandlmayr and a kind of Paul Lovens bustle. The opening “Gregory Grant Machine” is terrific, moving between sections of Polwechsel’s flinty sparseness and solemn moving chords from low woodwinds, continually dipping in and out of silence. It’s an approach that Hauf favors for this instrumentation, and he uses it even more effectively on “Eighteen Ghost Roads,” whose slow sectional chords rise patiently and deliberately to a stately, ROVA-esque feel before erupting in a threeway percussive rumble that sets up a different context for the same horn movement. There’s plenty of variation on the record, lest you think there are simply different settings for this general approach. Each tune features great attention to tonal / timbral contrast, often pitting high whining feedback against eructations from the lower horns. A burble of reed popping sets the course on “Fame & Riches,” which morphs via woven tones and the gentlest, deftest cymbal work into a sustained hum of an atmosphere. And the closing “Wayward Lanes” races along with a skirling series of bass clarinet patterns wending through a thicket of rimshots. It’s a compelling record, a consistent study of contained tension and contrasts.

Dan Warburton, PT

Mixture of European concepts and American know-how

Fascinated by the minimalist textures revealed by balancing percussion and reed timbres plus an overlay of electronics, Berlin-based saxophonist Boris Hauf convened these telekinetic exercises in collective improvisation during a 2010 busman`s holiday in Chicago.
A frequent visitor to that city, Hauf is best known for his work with the efzeg combo, but these CDs are even more reductionist. Replacing the guitars that were part of efzeg with piano micro-tonalism of one-name Austrian Juun, plus his own harmonium playing on Proxemics, Hauf fills out the juddering narrative with contributions from his tenor and soprano saxophones, Keefe Jackson’s contrabass clarinet and tenor saxophone and Steven Hess’s drum beats. Hess, who is almost prominent in metal bands; Hauf and Jackson, who leads his own band and is a fixture in Chicago FreeBop combos; are all accounted for on Next Delusion with the trio augmented by exploratory Windy City bass clarinetist Jason Stein and two additional drummers: Michael Hartman and Frank Rosaly, both of whom gig frequently on the Chi-town Jazz scene.
In all honesty the discrepancy in the sound density between four or six players is minimal. Both measured and lingering the sextet’s four tracks travel a similar linear path as the three advanced by the quartet. If anything the most audible variation is the prominent reed textures Next Delusion. Often Stein’s bass clarinet, Jackson’s contrabass clarinet and the lower notes from Hauf’s tenor inflate together into an exposition of subterranean-pitched, tugboat-horn-like blowing. At the same time the output is never completely opaque, as split tones, snorts as well as linear air movements are also audible. Although the potential exists for rhythmic heavy-handedness from the three accomplished drummers, instead the percussionists are exemplary in cooperation. For every explosion of united rolls, ruffs and rebounds that upsets the chromatic cohesion, there are many more instances of the kit manipulators limiting themselves to rumbling timbres on drum tops or isolating cymbal claps and splashes.
If there’s a defining track it’s “Fame & Riches”; obviously no reflection of those involved with experimental improvised music. Beginning with reed tongue-slaps, flutters and squeaks, bass clarinet slurps and contrabass clarinet slurs eventually coagulate into a dense, nearly motionless reed mass. Finally meticulously angled saxophone lines and microtonal drum slaps reanimate the sequence.
Similar microtonal, chromatic interface is obvious on Proxemics, even if oscillating and shrill signal processing from Hauf’s sine tone and Hess’s electronics are more obvious. So are individual reed and piano strategies that reference Free Jazz. “Social”, the shortest track, contrasts straightforward tenor saxophone split tones backed by piano comping and drum top spanks. As Juan alternates her output between marimba-like string plucks and tremolo keyboard runs, puffing saxophone and clarinet air expelling maintain the track’s fragile equilibrium. Cascading and continuous harmonium washes on “Personal” similarly bring forth razzing sibilates from Jackson plus strident no-mouthpiece body toots from Hauf’s horn.
This combination of austere friction, moderated lyricism and near-ambient electronic synthesis is expanded to its fullest on the more than 29½ -minute “Public”. While the electronic shimmies often produce an unyielding ostinato as the horn men’s slurs slide into one another, there are still enough obvious jagged edges to keep the track lively. Among the standout signs are Juan’s clattering piano keys and tickling minimalist note patterns; bell-ringing and sequence-shattering from the percussionist’s raps and rolls; plus key percussion, mouthpiece whistling and balanced tongue slaps from the saxophonists.
With a mixture of European concepts and American know-how, Hauf and company maintain individual expression among the harmonies and rhythms of extended group expression. Both sessions make an impression and the textural attribute of either band could be advantageously developed by Hauf for further sound explorations.
Ken Waxman

REVIEWS

Reedman Boris Hauf frequently pushes the envelope. For evidence, one need only look at his longstanding affiliation with the avant-garde, acoustic-electric Austrian band Efzeg, known for subliminal sound-sculpting mechanics and ethereal subtleties. However, his repertoire is quite extensive. Making frequent trips to Chicago over the years, he has aligned with like-minded individuals and noted improvisers, often residing on the same musical plane, similar visions coalescing for unpredictable outcomes. On this release, Hauf merges a three-horn attack with three drummers. Needless to state, the band’s makeup and scope of intent offer abstract permutations amid a keenly inventive platform, where hidden meanings are slowly revealed.

Glenn Astarita

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